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Get out that 
Welcome mat.... 


You’re set for business 
— ‘Brother Rat’ style! 











This IS a GREAT SHOW about which to get EXCITED! 


— and why not... you wanted more of that excellent ‘Brother 
Rat’ business, well, here it is...With DOUBLE the chance to top 
it, because everybody surely will go for this follow-up hit! No need 
to lose any sleep about selling this attraction. Just give it every- 
thing you gave ‘Brother Rat’ with more of a wham for good measure. 
Build on that ‘Baby’ angle. The screen has had a lot of babies, but 
oh boy, what a baby this is! . . . What a Show! . . . What an 
Exploitation set-up! 





ADVERTISING READY TO RUN... 


A wide variety of ads carrying the same successful 
‘Brother Rat’ treatment in art and copy ... plus the 
added appeal of the ‘Baby’ angle ... It’s a winner! 


PUBLICITY READY TO PLANT... 


Again capitalizing on the tremendous publicity and 
radio build-up accorded ‘Brother Rat,’ you have 


columns of story and art with which to carry on! 


POSTERS READY TO MAKE A SHOWING... 


This is a show to ‘bill’ and we've given you the kind 
of advertising accessories that command attention. 


Another way to get ’em coming to your theatre! 


EXPLOITATION READY FOR ACTION. . . 


What exploitation possibilities! . .. Contests, Tie-ups, 
Stunts, Lobby Displays, Sweetheart angle and Baby 


Stuff, and more! All sure-fire, theatre-tested ideas! 








Vv, 


~ We 


“a 
CAST 

Joyce Winfree. . - +. - > PRISCILLA LANE 
Billy Randolph . WAYNE MORRIS 
Kates JANE BRYAN 
‘Bing’ Edwards . EDDIE ALBERT 
Claire Terry . JANE WYMAN 
Dan Crawford RONALD REAGAN 
Commencement PETER B. GOOD 
Snelling . Arthur Treacher 


Major Terry . Moroni Olsen 


Mrs. Brooks 
Harley Harrington . 


. Jessie Busley 
Larry Williams 
. Berton Churchill 
. Nana Bryant 


Mr. Harper 

Mrs. Harper . 

Sterling Randolph 

Girl in Bus 

Cab Driver oe 22 vs 


. Paul Harvey 
Mayo Methot 
. Ed Gargan 


PRODUCTION STAFF 
Directed by RAY ENRIGHT 


Original Screen Play by John Monks, Jr. and Fred F. Finklehoffe; Direc- 

tor of Photography, Charles Rosher, A.S.C.; Art Director, Robert Haas; 

Dialogue Director, Hugh Cummings; Film Editor, Clarence Kolster; 

Gowns by Milo Anderson; Sound by Stanley Jones; Make-up Artist, 

Perc Westmore; Musical Director, Leo F. Forbstein; Special Effects by 
Byron Haskins, A.S.C. and Willard Van Enger, A.S.C. 





STORY 


(Not for publication.) A year has elapsed since Bing Edwards (Eddie 
Albert), Billy Randolph (Wayne Morris) and Dan Crawford (Ronald 
Reagan), the three "Brother Rats," graduated from military college. 
Billy and Dan are in New York City, working for Billy's father (Paul 
Harvey). Bing loses his job as a small town athletic coach. He sets out 
by bus for New York, with Kate (Jane Bryan) and their baby Com- 
mencement (Peter B. Good), hoping to get a job as a varsity coach 
from Major Terry (Moroni Olsen) and Billy's father, who is president of 
the alumni association. En route, Commencement swallows a passenger's 
diamond ring and Bing is forced to leave Kate and the baby as security. 
In New York, he stops with Kate's aunt and uncle, the Harpers. They 
are just leaving for Washington and leave $200 with Bing to pay for an 
important C.O.D. package that must be forwarded to them. Billy per- 
suades Bing to use the money to get Kate and Commencement "out of 
hock." They hope to get the money back on the ring—but it proves to 
be a phoney. Joyce Winfree (Priscilla Lane), en route for Honolulu, 
and Claire Terry (Jane Wyman), Billy and Dan's girl friends of “Brother 
Rat" days, arrive in New York. Billy, in the bad graces of his father, is 
short on cash. Stuck for cab fare, he gives the driver the Harper's 
invaluable Stradivarius violin as security. When all is blackest, resources 
are pooled. Joyce sells her steamship ticket and the Harper package is 
sent off. Claire persuades her father the only way to forget Dan is 
taking the trip with Joyce. As soon as she gets the ticket, it is sold and 
the Stradivarius is returned. All seems pacific, when Commencement 
sets fire to the Harpers apartment! Their troubles are all over, however, 
when the "Brother Rats" and their girl friends, aided by Commence- 
ment, put over Uncle Harper's Peruvian Airship Line. 





Still BB 415; Mat 301—45c 


THEY'RE BACK WITH A BANG—AND A BABY! The stars of that hit comedy "Brother Rat" are back in a brand-new 
sequel, "Brother Rat and a Baby," which will have its first local showing at the Strand on Friday. (Left to right) Wayne 


Morris, Priscilla Lane, Peter B. Good (the baby), 


Eddie Albert, Jane Bryan, Ronald Reagan and Jane Wyman. 





‘Brother Rat and A Baby’ Opens Friday 
At the Strand With ‘Brother Rat’ Stars 


“Brother Rat and a Baby,” 
the comedy successor to last 
year’s comedy success, “Brother 
Rat,” will be the next attraction 
at the Strand Theatre, starting 
on Friday. Written by the same 
authors as the delightful orig- 
inal stage and screen play, John 
Monks, Jr. and Fred F. Finkle- 
hoffe, the film continues the ad- 
ventures of a group of Virginia 
Military Institute cadets after 
their graduation. 

In following up last season’s 
comedy hit, Warner Bros. has 
combined calendar fact with film 
fiction by making the period be- 
tween the two stories coincide 
with the time lapse between the 
pictures. 

“Brother Rat” was filmed just 
a year ago. In the follow-up pro- 
duction, the same players are 
picking up the lives of the same 
movie characters after a lapse 
of just one year. 

The first production, it will be 
recalled, saw Wayne Morris, 
Eddie Albert and Ronald Rea- 
gan safely graduated from mili- 
tary college. It also saw Albert 
and Miss Bryan the proud par- 
ents of a newly born baby boy. 
Morris and Reagan got no fur- 
ther than engagements to Pris- 
cilla Lane and Jane Wyman. 

When “Brother Rat and a 
Baby” picks them up once more, 
Morris and Reagan are working 
in New York. Miss Lane and 
Miss Wyman are still in college. 
Albert and Miss Bryan are liv- 
ing in a small southern town, 
where he is the high school ath- 
letic coach. And their baby is a 
bouncing, mischief - making 
youngster just past his first 
birthday. 

The baby role is played by 
Peter B. Good, the only member 
of the cast to fudge a trifle on 
the calendar. Peter was 14 
months old the day he was 
signed for the part. 

The characters are all brought 
together, and the new story 
starts on its way when Albert, 
Miss Bryan and the baby are 
brought to New York to see 
about a better job for the head 
of the family as varsity coach. 


[4] 


Complications immediately en- 
sue. Before they even arrive in 
New York, Commencement, the 
baby gets them’ into trouble by 
swallowing a diamond ring be- 
longing to one of the passengers 
on the bus. Jane and the baby 
are forced to stay as security 
while Eddie goes on the New 
York to try to get the money 
needed to get them out of hock. 
In order to get it, Eddie has to 
appropriate some funds entrust- 
ed to him by the people they 
are to visit in New York. Finally 
the whole clan are together in 
the big city, but the other two 
couples aren’t having too easy a 
time of it either. The two girls 
are supposed to be going on a 
vacation trip to Honolulu, but 
they cash in their tickets to help 


‘Brother Rat and Baby’ 
To Show At Strand 


Although Peter B. Good plays 
only the second half of the title 
role of “Brother Rat and a 
Baby”, the Warner Bros. com- 
edy opening Friday at the 
Strand Theatre, it is his ex- 
ploits which lead to all the 
riotous plot complications in 
the film. 

The new film is a sequel to 
the recent comedy success 
“Brother Rat’, with the same 
stars — Priscilla Lane, Wayne 
Morris, Jane Bryan, Eddie Al- 
bert, Jane Wyman and Ronald 
Reagan, and a host of well- 
known featured players. Based 
on a story by John Monks, Jr. 
and Fred F. Finklehoffe, and 
directed by Ray Enright, it 
deals with the post-graduation 
adventures of the Brothers Rat. 


DOUBLE DUTY SCENES 
The scenes in this publicity 
section may also be used for 


the ''Can You Name These 


Stars" Contest. See page 13 
for details. 





the boys out of financial difficul- 
ties. Baby Commencement fur- 
ther complicates matters by 
causing his daddy to lose the 
job he came to New York to get, 
and finally by setting fire to the 
apartment. But he squares mat- 
ters for everybody in the sur- 
prise finish. 

Ray Enright directed the film, 
which is played with emphasis 
on the comedy side, and advance 
preview critics have pronounced 
it even more fresh and delight- 
ful than the earlier “Brother 
Rat.” 

Besides the seven principals 
already mentioned, the cast in- 
cludes Arthur Treacher, Moroni 
Olsen, Jessie Busley, Larry Wil- 
liams, Berton Churchill, Nana 
Bryant and several others. 





Six Stars Top Cast Of 


New Strand Comedy 


Heading the cast of “Brother 
Rat and a Baby”, the comedy 
opening Friday at the Strand 
Theatre, are Priscilla Lane, 
Wayne Morris, Jane Bryan, Ed- 
die Albert, Jane Wyman, Ron- 
ald Reagan, and 14-months old 
Peter B. Good who plays the 
“Baby” part of the title. Also 
featured in the cast are Arthur 
Treacher, Moroni Olsen, Jessie 
Busley, Larry Williams and 
many others. 

The story, which was written 
by John Monks, Jr. and Fred 
F. Finklehoffe, takes up the ad- 
ventures of the “Brother Rat” 
characters just one year after 
graduation from V. M. I. One of 
the three erstwhile cadets is al- 
ready a family man, the other 
two are just having girl trouble. 
““Commencement’’, the baby 
who was born on graduation 
day, is the real little trouble- 
maker and his exploits land his 
mother and father and the other 
two couples into an _ hilarious 
series of adventures and mis- 
adventures. The production was 
directed by Ray Enright, one 
of Hollywood’s ace directors of 
romantic comedies. 


“BROTHER RAT AND A BABY”’—ADVANCE PUBLICITY 


PIII I IIIA III III IIIA III ISAIAH IAI AISI SI AISI SAIS SSIS SCS SCSI SI OASIS ISI SIS III ISS SSIS II AAAI SAA SSD SAIS IAA IAAI AAAI AA AISA SAIS AIA AIDA SAAD A A AIA AO 


Brother Rat’ Stars Return 
In Sequel After Busy Year 


“Brother Rat and a Baby,” 
the new Warner Bros. comedy 
opening Friday at the Strand, 
picks up the lives of the prin- 
cipal characters of last year’s 
comedy hit, “Brother Rat,” just 
one year later. 

Apparently, nothing very im- 
portant happened to the “Broth- 
er Rat” characters during the 
past year. But a lot happened to 
the film players who are bring- 


ing those characters to the 
screen. 
Morris married the former 


Bubbles Schinasi, cigarette heir- 
ess, and has recently become a 
real life father. He also fur- 
thered his screen career by do- 
ing several successful pictures, 
including “The Kid from Koko- 
mo,” and moved into a palatial 
estate in the Brentwood district. 

Miss Lane became a screen 
star, and with her sister, Rose- 
mary, bought a home in Laurel 
Canyon. She was rumored mar- 
ried to Oren Haglund (but it 
was only a rumor). And she 
worked about as hard as any 
young star ever had done in 
Hollywood, making “Yes My 
Darling Daughter,” ‘Daughters 
Courageous,” “Dust Be My Des- 
tiny,” “The Roaring Twenties” 
and “Four Wives.” 

Albert went back to New York 
and starred in the Broadway 
musical show, “The Boys from 


Hollywood to appear in “O 
Your Toes,” and “Four Wives. 

Like Miss Lane, Miss Bryan 
became a full-fledged star. She 
won a critics poll for a best 
supporting performance of the 
month in “The Old Maid,” with 
Bette Davis and Miriam Hop- 
kins. And she had the thrill of 
making her first trip across the 
continent. 

Perhaps the most important 
thing that happened to Miss 
Wyman and Reagan was their 
discovery of each other. ‘‘Broth- 
er Rat” started that, and they 
plan to finish it by getting mar- 
ried. They officially announced 
their engagement a few days 
ago. 

As for Peter B. Good, the 
baby, a lot happened to him dur- 
ing the past year. He came from 
Switzerland to America. He 
moved from San Francisco to 
Hollywood. And matching the 
records of Miss Lane and Miss 
Bryan, he became a movie star. 

“Brother Rat and a Baby” 
continues the madcap adven- 
tures of the three cadets after 
their graduation from V. M. I. 
Albert, who became a father on 
Commencement Day, is’ the 
proud papa of little ‘“Com- 
mencement” (Peter B. Good). 
Jane Bryan is the mother, and 
Priscilla Lane and Jane Wyman 
are the girl friends of Morris 


Sa 





Syracuse.” Then he returned to and Reagan, respectively. 
9 
eas att 
Re, Os Introducing 


oS eS 


If a contest were held to de- 
termine the screen’s most out- 
standing problem child, ‘‘Com- 
mencement” would be elected by 
unanimous acclaim. 

The little trouble maker of 
“Brother Rat and a_ Baby,” 
Warner Bros. production open- 
ing at the Strand Friday, which 
reunites the Virginia Military 
Institute cadets of “Brother 
Rat,” now alumni, is the screen 
property of Jane Bryan and 
Eddie Albert, his ever loving 
but harrassed parents. 

“Commencement” started his 
career of joyous mischief by be- 





Still PG Pub A2; Mat 107—15c 
PETER B. GOOD—who plays the 


second half of the title role in 
“Brother Rat and a Baby", the new 
comedy opening Friday at the Strand. 





ing born while his father was 
still an undergraduate, but bal- 
anced this infringement of regu- 
lations by winning for his father 
the school prize for the first 
graduate to have a baby. 

His talent for trouble has 
been developing rapidly and 
now, at the age of one year, 
“Commencement” has a record 
that would do credit to a vet- 
eran. 

Chosen for this role was 14- 
month old Peter B. Good who 
makes his screen debut. As 
“Commencement,” this baby 


“brother rat” is second only to © 


the irrespressible Billy of the 





2 Wy ly ° 
5 ae vA Brother Rat's Baby 





picture (Wayne Morris) in the 
matter of trouble making. 

He gets off to a good start by 
swallowing a quarter, thereby 
costing his father his job as ath- 
letic coach at a high school when 
the worried parent dashes home, 
leaving his baseball team right 
at the start of a championship 


game. 
Then, when Albert, Miss Bry- 
an and ‘‘Commencement” dash 


to New York to investigate the 
chances of Albert’s becoming 
varsity coach at V. M. I., the 
baby swallows the diamond ring 
of a fellow passenger. 

“Commencement” is left at 
the apartment of his mother’s 
uncle and aunt where Morris, 
Priscilla Lane, Jane Wyman 
and Ronald Reagan promise to 
“look after” him. “Commence- 
ment” combs Miss Wyman’s 
hair into a shambles which her 
father (Henry O’Neill) who sud- 
denly appears, takes to be the 
handiwork of Reagan whom he 
suspects of conduct unbecoming 
a gentleman. 

Not content with spiking 
young love, “Commencement” 
continues his cataclysmic career 
by breaking O’Neill’s priceless 
clipper ship model. 

When the thoughtless Billy 
(Morris) gives the baby his cig- 
aret lighter to play with, “Com- 
mencement” obligingly starts a 
fire. 

The climax of his activities 
occurs when he is stowed away 
in an airplane and he is not dis- 
covered until the plane lands in 
Peru. 


STILL SERVICE! ... 


Stills available on most of the 
scene cuts on the publicity 
pages in this Campaign Plan. 
Price 15¢ each. Order by still 
number indicated under each 
cut, from Campaign Plan Ed- 


itor. If still number is not 
given, photo is not available 
because the cut was made 
from a special retouch or a 
composite. (*Asterisk denotes 
still is included in regular set 
available at local Vitagraph 
Exchanges.) 


Reagan, Jane Wyman 
Make Their Screen 
Romance Come True 


Ending speculation concerning 
the romantic rumors that have 
linked their names for the past 
several weeks, Jane Wyman and 
Ronald Reagan, Warner Bros. 
screen players, have announced 





their engagement. In making the | 


announcement, Miss Wyman dis- 
played a 52-carat amethyst ring 
Reagan gave her. Amethyst, she 
explained, is his birthstone, and 
she chose it instead of the con- 
ventional diamond. 

The players plan to be mar- 
ried after they return to Holly- 
wood from a personal appear- 
ance tour in which they are 
now engaged. They started on 
the tour immediately after com- 
pleting their roles as_ screen 
sweethearts in the _ picture, 
“Brother Rat and a Baby,” and 
will be back in the film capital 
shortly after the first of the new 
year. 

The studio romance had its 
inception a year ago in a movie 





Still BB 406; Mat 101—15c 
THEY'RE A TWOSOME—Jane 
Wyman and Ronald Reagan, one of 
the romantic teams in ‘Brother Rat 
and a Baby", have announced their 
off-screen engagement, as well. 





love affair that had the athletic 
Reagan wooing the blonde Miss 
Wyman in the comedy hit, 
“Brother Rat.” After completion 
of that picture, the two were 
seen together with growing fre- 
quency, but it has only been re- 
cently that Hollywood has re- 
garded their friendship as a 
serious romance. 

Both players are under con- 
tract to Warner Bros. where 
they started their screen career. 
Both scored their greatest suc- 
cesses to date in “Brother Rat,” 
the picture that inspired their 
romance. That romance, inci- 
dentally ends in matrimony in 
the current follow-up picture, 
“Brother Rat and a Baby.” 





"Twas A Little of Both 


Wayne Morris was playing a 
scene for Warner Bros.’ “Broth- 
er Rat and a Baby,” in which he 
was to make a hurried jump 
from a taxi-cab while keeping 
up a running fire of conversa- 
tion with the driver. As he left 
the cab, he apparently pinched 
his arm in the door. 

“Oww-ouch!” he yelled. 

“What’s the matter Wayne?” 
demanded Director Ray Enright, 
“did you really hurt yourself, or 
did you forget your lines?” 

“Well, if you must know the 
truth,” Morris replied, “I did a 
little of the first, and quite a 
lot of the last-mentioned.” 


[5] 





Still BB 413; Mat 205—30c 


BROTHER RAT AND A BABY—AND OH! WHAT A BABY! Wayne Morris 


has his arms full of charm and Priscilla Lane has that love light in her 


eyes, because they're sweethearting again in 
sequel to their earlier romantic comedy success, 


“Brother Rat and a Baby", a 
"Brother Rat". 





Priscilla Lane Has Made 
Swift March to Stardom 


Twelve years ago a golden- 
haired girl of 10 marched out 
on the stage of a school audi- 
torium in Indianola, Iowa, to 
do a military dance. She wore 
a tall military cap _ perched 
jauntily on her yellow curls. As 
she danced the cap bounced 
down over her eyes, then fell 
off her head. 

In great disgust, but with no 
loss of dignity, the girl danced 
up to the cap. Then she gave it 
a kick that sent it sailing out 
over the footlights-and into the 
audience, 

That was Priscilla Lane’s de- 
but as an entertainer. It was 
an inauspicious, if somewhat 
spectacular, beginning for a ca- 
reer that has blossomed bril- 
liantly. Today, at 22, Priscilla is 
a screen star with a long term 
contract and a bright future at 
Warner Bros. studio. 

Among the many exciting 
things that have happened to 
her, Priscilla recalls the mishap 
with the cap very vividly. It 
happened that military dance 
was the very first solo part 
she had been permitted to do in 
school entertainments. 

Deciding that despite her lack 
of success as a school thespian, 
her daughter had acting talent, 
Mrs. Lane sent Priscilla to the 
Fagin School of Dramatic Arts 
in New York City. Later, the 
mother and Priscilla’s_ sister, 
Rosemary, joined her in New 
York. 

The two girls were trying out 
some songs in a music publish- 
ing firm one day when Fred 
Waring dropped in. He listened, 
casually at first, then more in- 
tently. Before they left, they 
had been offered the opportunity 
of joining his Pennsylvanians. 
Their mother consented to their 
acceptance, and agreed to go on 
tour with them as chaperone. 

Priscilla was 14 at the time. 
Back in Indianola, she would 
have been a high school sopho- 
more. 

With Waring, the Lane sis- 
ters played theaters from Broad- 
way to half a hundred Main 
Streets. They were featured in 
night clubs and on the air. They 
sang, danced, did smart patter 
and dramatic skits, even told 
bed-time stories for the kiddies 
not so very much younger than 
themselves. It was great train- 
ing, and invaluable experience. 
By the time Priscilla would 
have been receiving her high 
school diploma, she was a sea- 
soned trouper and a celebrity. 

When Waring’s band was 
signed by Warner Bros. for the 
musical film “Varsity Show,” 
the Lane sisters were included 
in the deal. And when the Penn- 


sylvanians moved on, Priscilla 
and Rosemary remained at the 
studio under contract as film 
actresses. Priscilla appeared next 
in “Love, Honor and Behave” 
and “Cowboy from Brooklyn,” 
which made use of her singing 
and dancing abilities. 

Priscilla’s progress since has 
been a swift march to stardom, 
a status that she attained with 
her performance in ‘‘Four 
Daughters.” Since that picture, 
she has played starring roles in 
“Brother Rat,” “Yes, My Dar- 
ling Daughter,’ ‘Daughters 
Courageous.” “Dust Be my Des- 
tiny,” “The Roaring Twenties” 
(opposite James Cagney) “Four 
Wives,’’ and the current 
“Brother Rat and a Baby,” which 
opens at the Strand Friday. 





Sticks Close to His Gal 


Ronald Reagan didn’t have to 
be told twice when Director Ray 
Enright instructed him to keep 
close to Jane Wyman in a scene 
of Warner Bros.’ “Brother Rat 
and a Baby.” In fact, he obeyed 
orders too well—and Jane lost 
part of her skirt. 

It happened Reagan was fol- 
lowing Miss Wyman into a night 
club setting. In obeying the 
director’s instructions to keep 
close, he stepped on the trailing 
hem of her gown. There was a 
ripping sound, and Jane and the 
back half of the skirt parted 
company. Fortunately, the skirt 
chanced to be one of those filmy 
creations worn over a founda- 
tion slip, so the only person em- 
barrassed was Reagan. 


Precocious Infant 


Tacked on the door of one of 
the stage dressing rooms on the 
“Brother Rat and a Baby” set 
at Warner Bros. was a neat 
placard bearing the following 
printed notice: “This dressing 
room is furnished for your con- 
venience. Occupants are request- 
ed by the studio not to throw 
cigarette butts on the floor.” 

The placard was similar to 
those posted on all the stage 
dressing rooms, but in this par- 
ticular case it was amusing. 
The room was occupied by Peter 
B. Good, the baby star of the 
picture, who is 14 months old. 


“BROTHER RAT AND A BABY”’—ADVANCE PUBLICITY 


RAIA IIIA I III IAI AIA A AAA AIA AAAS ASIA AI SSIS ASIA A SAA SAA SISA SIA SISA SISA SADA SAA SAA SISA SSSA SSS SASS SSA S SAS ASDA SSSA SSS SSSA SS SAS SASS SASS SS SAS SASSSSSCSACMA 
e 

Comedienne Jane Wyman 

Has No Yen for Drama 





Still BB 55; Mat 203—30c 
BUTLER MEETS BABY—Arthur Treacher (left), No. | screen butler has his 
first meeting with the species infantus in ‘Brother Rat and a Baby". Peter B. 
Good is the baby, Eddie Albert and Jane Bryan the proud parents and 
Wayne Morris (center) is just kibitzing. 





Spoke Too Soon, So Wayne 
Morris Has to Lat Words 


“Embarrassment,” said Wayne 
Morris, “is a luxury in which 
screen actors can’t indulge dur- 
ing working hours.” 

Morris had just been kneeling 
before Priscilla Lane, making 
an ardent declaration of love, 
topped off by a proposal of mar- 
riage. Some 60 persons, com- 
prising the crew of Warner 
Bros.’ “Brother Rat and a Baby” 
had watched and listened. It 
was old stuff to them, neverthe- 
less most of them had grinned 
at the spectacle of the blonde 
young giant kneeling before the 
slim blonde girl. 

“I’d certainly feel like a fool 
if I had to make a real proposal 
before an audience,” Morris con- 
tinued. “But for a picture scene 
it’s all in the day’s work. A fel- 
low has to become accustomed 
to making a spectacle of him- 
self, especially in comedy.” 

Ray Enright, the director, cut 
short the discussion by calling 
Morris back to do the scene 
again. Miss Lane was seated on 
a davenport, and Morris dropped 
nonchalantly to his knees before 
her. His nonchalance_ disap- 
peared, however, when the stage 


door opened, and a party of vis- 
itors filed in. Enright apparently 
didn’t notice. He gave the signal 
for the scene to start. 

Morris took Miss_ Lane’s 
hands in his and started his 
declaration: ‘““Now that I’ve got 
you in a comfortable position, 
could I interest you in a slightly 
used marriage certificate?” 

He got through that flippant 
introduction rather well, but as 
he launched into his impassioned 
plea, he began to stammer and 
stumble. A dull red mounted 
above his collar rim and suf- 
fused his face. There was no 
doubt about it. He was blushing. 

“Cut,” said Enright. “We'll 
start again.” 

It took three tries for the 
scene to be filmed satisfactorily, 
and the visitors stuck through 
to the end. As they filed out, 
smiling and chuckling, Morris 
walked over. 


“It seems,” he said, “I made 
a slight mistake in what I told 
you. I should have said embar- 
rassment is a luxury in which 
screen actors ought not indulge 
during working hours.” 


Romance Has Head 
Start in ‘Brother 
Rat and A Baby’ 


Romance gets away to a run- 
ning start in Warner Bros.’ 
“Brother Rat and a _ Baby,” 
opening at the Strand, because 
the boys have already met the 
girls and are well past the cas- 
ual acquaintance stage. One of 
them, in fact, has already mar- 
ried the girl. 

The introductions were per- 
formed in “Brother Rat,” while 
Eddie Albert, Wayne Morris 
and Ronald Reagan were cadets 
at a Southern military college. 
Albert married Jane’ Bryan. 
Morris and Reagan didn’t get 
quite so far with Priscilla Lane 
and Jane Wyman, respectively, 
but made nice progress. ‘‘Broth- 
er Rat and a Baby” picks up 
the same characters a year after 
the boys have graduated from 
college. As a result, when Pris- 
cilla and Jane come to New 
York, where Wayne and Ronald 
are working, the boys are able 
to start with kisses instead of 
handshakes. 

As for Albert and Jane Bryan, 
they are already the proud but 
harassed parents of an impish 
youngster, played by fourteen- 
month-old Peter B. Good, whose 
antics bring about most of the 
hilarious complications in the 
plot of “Brother Rat and a 
Baby.” 





Film Cupid Scores Hit 


Ronald Reagan has gone the 
fans who copy the movie fash- 
ions one better. He’s copying 
his own movie romance in real 
life. A year ago, Reagan and 
Jane Wyman were cast as sweet- 
hearts in Warner Bros.’ “Broth- 
er Rat.” They continue the ro- 
mance in “Brother Rat and a 
Baby”—and afterward. Wedding 
bells seem to be indicated. 





Jane Bryan=A Star Without Stardust 





Jane Bryan has been made a 
full-fledged screen star, and she 
isn’t altogether happy about it. 

She has lived in Hollywood all 
of her life, and is more im- 
pressed by the responsibility of 
stardom than the glamour. And 
she doesn’t completely share her 
studio’s confidence that she is 
ready for them. 

What she’d really like to do 
would be to skip the star title 
and go along playing roles like 
the ones she did with Bette 
Davis and Miriam Hopkins in 
“The Old Maid”—small but im- 
portant featured parts. Warner 
Bros. has decreed, however, that 
she is a star because of her per- 
formance in that picture. So 
she’ll do her best to live up to 
her billing. 

She’s getting her first chances 
to do that in “Invisible Stripes,” 
with George Raft, and in the 
current “Brother Rat and a 
Baby.” In the latter picture, she 
plays the mother of the baby 
star, Peter B. Good. She thinks 
if she can get away with that 
convincingly, she may be en- 
titled to star rating. 

One of the hardest things Jane 
will have to do as a star is learn 
to talk about herself. She’s only 
21, has always lived at home 
with her parents and _ three 
younger brothers, and is con- 
vinced that her private life is 
as interesting to the public as 
the title credits of a “companion 
feature.” 

She’ll wax ecstatic in talking 


about the stage. She’ll overflow 
with enthusiasm in discussing 
the work and fine qualities of 
her particular idol, Bette Davis. 
She’ll glow over the thrills of a 
football game, and talk breath- 
lessly about books and music, 





Mat 103—15c 


JANE BRYAN—Starring in ‘Brother 
Rat and a Baby” 





sunsets and woods in the au- 
tumn. But let the conversation 
shift to herself, and a clam is 
positively loquacious by compar- 
ison. 

Probe deftly enough and with 
sufficient patience, however, and 
it is possible to pry some per- 
sonal information from her. 

She has never been movie 


struck, and still isn’t. But she 
has always been stage struck, 
and still is. Ever since she 
signed a contract with Warner 
Bros., she has been trying to 
persuade the studio to “farm 
her out” to the stage. 

She hasn’t asked for Broad- 
way. Summer stock in Pough- 
keepsie—or Podunk—would suit 
her fine. She has gotten exactly 
nowhere with her requests, and 
now that she is a star, she has 
less chance than ever. 

She thinks glamour is a lot of 
bunk, doesn’t care much for 
clothes, and all she knows about 
Hollywood parties is what she 
reads in the papers. 

She has been too busy to 
think seriously about romance, 
but she isn’t a man hater. She 
thinks her freckles are a bother, 
but isn’t much concerned about 
them, because she’d never care 
about being a glamour girl. 

She’s fairly bursting with am- 
bition to express herself. But it 
will have to be on stage or 
screen. She isn’t much better at 
writing, dancing or music than 
she is at talking about herself. 





Blonde Jane Wyman is a Hol- 
lywood non-conformist, and ad- 
mits it. 

She’s a comedienne who 
doesn’t yearn to play dramatic 
roles. She loves to dine and 
dance at night clubs. She cares 
nothing about tennis or golf, 
and doesn’t pretend to. And she 
doesn’t bother her pretty head 
about the so- 
cial signifi- 
cance of her 
contribution 
to screen art. 

«T ha ag 
said Jane, as 
she sipped a 
late cup of 
coffee on the 
“Brother Rat 
and a Baby” 
set at War- 
ner Bros. 





Mat 105—15c 

JANE WYMAN 

about one 
hundred percent. out of step. 
Perhaps I’m a few years behind 
the times and should have been 
around in the days when film 
stars threw custard pies for a 
living and drove cream-colored, 
locomotive-size automobiles up 
and down the boulevard for 
recreation. 

“Seriously, though, I some- 
times think there must be some- 
thing wrong with me because I 
don’t yearn to play Camille, and 
because I’ll nearly always pass 
up a good book and a quiet eve- 
ning at home to go out with my 
favorite boy friend. 

“That, however, is the way I 
am, and I don’t seem to be able 
to do anything about it. Other 
actresses can have the heavy 
drama. Little Janey will strug- 
gle along with comedy—and love 
it. The only way I ever want 
to make people cry is through 


making them laugh.” 

Miss Wyman has large brown 
eyes that contrast strikingly 
with her ash blonde hair. They 
dance a merry accompaniment 
to her gay, vivacious chatter. 
Her hands are as restless as 
her eyes. Talking to her, one 
gets the impression she’s wound 
up like a tight spring. But the 
people who know her best say 
they’ve never seen her run down. 

She is not by any stretch of 
the imagination any ‘dizzy 
blonde,” however. There’s al- 
ways a strain of sound sense or 
bright keen humor in her gay 
chatter. 

Miss Wyman was born in St. 
Joseph, Missouri. Her real name 
is Sarah Jane Folks. She at- 
tended high school in Los An- 
geles and went back to Missouri 


to enter Columbia College. Too 


restless to finish college, she 
worked at such jobs as mani- 
curist, hairdresser, switchboard 
operator, secretary, fashion 
model and blues singer — and 
finally wound up in the movies. 

She says she always knew she 
wanted to be an actress, and 
figured that if she tried hard 
and long enough she would be. 

Right now, aside from her 
work but currently directly con- 
nected with it, her greatest in- 
terest is Ronald Reagan. Reagan 
is the actor she marries in 
“Brother Rat and a Baby.” And 
she makes no secret of the fact 
she expects to become Mrs. Rea- 
gan in real life. 

It’s a love match. You can be 
sure of that, because Jane says 
she’s even willing to let Ronnie 
teach her to play golf. Another 
example of her unconvention- 
ality is that she wouldn’t allow 
him to buy her a diamond en- 
gagement ring, but insisted on 
an amethyst. 





He’s Brother Rats Baby! 





Still BB Pub L; Mat 201—30c 
“I'M IN THE MOVIES, FOLKS!"—Although Peter B. Good is still in three- 
cornered pants, he has already polished off his first movie role as the small 
trouble-maker in “Brother Rat and a Baby" and he's ready for more. ‘Brother 
Rat and a Baby", which stars Priscilla Lane, Wayne Morris, Jane Bryan, 
Eddie Albert, Jane Wyman and Ronald Reagan, opens Friday at the Strand. 


“BROTHER RAT AND A BABY”’—CURRENT PUBLICITY 


OOOO ICID ISIC OIRO II IOI IOS ISOS IO IO IT OS OT OOS OSS OOS OO SIS Ib bt bo 


‘Brother Rat and A Baby’ Hits Year’s 
High in Hilarious Film Comedies 


New ‘Brother Rat’ 
Comedy Opening 
Today at Strand 


(Opening Day) 

“Brother Rat and a Baby,” 
Warner Bros. new sequel to the 
comedy hit “Brother Rat,” will 
have its first local showing at 
the Strand Theatre today. Head- 
ing the cast are Priscilla Lane, 
Wayne Morris, Eddie Albert, 
Jane Bryan, Jane Wyman, Ron- 
ald Reagan and Peter B. Good, 
the infant actor who plays the 
second half of the title. 

Based on a story by John 
Monks, Jr. and Fred F. Finkle- 
hoff, who originated the “Brother 
Rat” comedy for the stage and 
later for the screen, the new 
film continues the adventures 
of trio of V.M.I. cadets after 
graduation. Eddie Albert, the 
Brother Rat who became a 
father on Commencement Day, 
is the proud screen papa of 
little Peter B. Good and Jane 
Bryan is the mother. Wayne 
Morris and Priscilla Lane pick 
up the tangled threads of their 
romance where they left off in 
“Brother Rat” and _ Ronald 
Reagan and Jane Bryan are 
another twosome, bucking pa- 
rental disapproval. 

The six of them meet in New 
York to try to get Albert the 
job of varsity coach at V.M.I., 
but the baby manages to throw 
their plans out of gear. With 
his innocent propensity for 
making mischief he manages to 
get them all in and out of 
trouble with remarkable speed. 
The cadets who thought all 
their troubles would be over if 
and when they managed to 
graduate from V.M.I. find that 
there are still some merry mix- 
ups for them to get into. 

The supporting cast includes 
such players as Arthur Treacher, 
Henry O’Neill, Moroni Olsen, 
Nana Bryant and _- several 





(Prepared Review) 


About a year ago, a highly 
hilarious comedy called “Brother 
Rat” romped merrily across 
the screen, dealing with the ad- 
ventures and misadventures of 
a trio of V.M.I. cadets and 
their rule-breaking prom 
“dates.” “Brother Rat and a 
Baby” picks up the same young- 
sters a year later and gives us 
another chapter in their check- 
ered careers. One of the gayest, 
most rollicking comedies to 
come out of Hollywood in many 
a moon, it was greeted with 
waves of appreciative laughter 
by the audiences at the Strand 
Theatre, where it opened yes- 
terday. 

If you’re up on your “Brother 
Rat” lore, you’ll remember that 
the cadet played by Eddie AlI- 
bert became a father the same 
day that he became an alumni 
of V.M.I. The baby is a year 
o!d now, and we go on record 
now as saying that we’ve never 
seen a cuter, saucier or more 
trouble-making youngster than 
Peter B. Good, the gentleman 
in the three-cornered pants who 
plays the second half of the 
title role. With the exception of 
Peter, the cast is the same as 
in the original story. Jane 
Bryan is Eddie Albert’s wife, 
Priscilla Lane and Wayne Mor- 
ris take up their romance 
where they left it in “Brother 
Rat,” as do Jane Wyman and 
Ronald Reagan. 


The film starts with Eddie 
Albert losing his job as a small- 
town high school athletic coach 
because he leaves in the middle 
of the “big game” to go home 
and tend to his baby, who has 
just swallowed a quarter. A 
wire arrives from Morris tell- 
ing Albert to rush to New York 
because the new varsity coach 
for V.M.I. is to be chosen 
there. The little family starts 
out on the bus, with Peter im- 
peding the trip somewhat by 
swallowing a diamond ring that 
belongs to another passenger. 
But these complications are as 
nothing compared with the 
amusing messes they get into 
when they get to New York 
and make contact with their 





Mat 202—30c 


MR. AND MRS. BROTHER RAT AND FAMILY-——Eddie Albert and Jane Byran 
are the happy though married film parents of Peter B. Good, in "Brother Rat 
and a Baby," the hit comedy which is currently showing at the Strand Theatre. 





four pals. Priscilla Lane and 
Jane Wyman, still college girls, 
are there for a few days before 
Priscilla is to leave on a trip 
to Honolulu and Jane is to re- 
turn south with her father, the 
commandant of V.M.I., who is 
anything but approving of her 
romance with Reagan. Albert 
and his family are staying at 
the swanky apartment of his 
wife’s aunt and uncle who are 
out of town. With the aid of 
small Peter and the others they 
soon turn it into a complete 
shambles, with Peter putting 
the finishing touch on by set- 
ting the place on fire. But it is 
Peter, too, who sets matters 
right for them all in the end. 

The performances are uni- 
formly excellent, as might be 
expected from a cast of such 
refreshing youngsters. Priscilla 
Lane and Jane Bryan, both of 
whom have achieved star rating 
since their appearance in 


“Brother Rat,” and Jane Wy- 
man are the kind of prom 
“dates” we imagine young col- 
lege men dream about, but sel- 
dom get. Eddie Albert is 
uproarious as the not-too-bright 
but very loving Bing Edwards, 
and Wayne Morris and Ronald 
Reagan are the most convincing 
scrape-getters-into we have yet 
to see. As noted above, we went 
hook, line and sinker for the 
infant charms of Peter B. Good, 
whose blonde hair has a most 
endearing habit .of standing 
straight up on top of his head. 

Besides the principals, the 
cast includes Arthur Treacher, 
Moroni Olsen, Larry Williams, 
Jessie Busley, Burton Churchill, 
Nana Bryant and several others, 
all of whom contribute outstand- 
ing performances. Ray Enright’s 
direction has made the most of 
the comedy situations in the 
script by John Monks, Jr. and 
Fred F. Finklehoffe. 


Priscilla Lane Has 
Star Comedy Role 
In New Strand Film 


Priscilla Lane is wondering if 
she is starting on her way to- 
ward an early second childhood. 

In her last two pictures, “Four 
Wives,” and “The Roaring 
Twenties,” she played a mother. 
In her newest film, “Brother Rat 
and a Baby,” opening at the 
Strand today, she’s a. giddy 
school girl making her first visit 
to New York. 

Miss Lane doesn’t mind, how- 
ever. She’s really only 22, and 
after almost a year of pretty 
strong dramatic fare, she’s glad 
to be back in comedy for a 
change. 

“When I was making ‘Four 
Wives,” the little Warner Bros. 
star said, “there were times 
when I thought I’d never want 
to do another crying scene. I 
had wept my way through most 
of ‘Dust Be My Destiny,’ and 
through part of ‘Daughters 
Courageous,’ and was getting 
pretty tired of having my emo- 
tions harrowed. 

“The ‘Roaring Twenties,’ with 
Jimmy Cagney, gave me a wel- 
come change of pace in the early 
sequences, but I had to get 
pretty emotional toward the end. 
I was fairly spoiling for comedy 
when I finished those last two 
pictures. And I certainly got it 
in this one. There isn’t a serious 
moment in it from beginning to 
end, and for a change it’s lots 
of fun. You can just cut loose 
and have a good time.” 

Miss Lane said she hadn’t yet 
made up her mind whether or 
not she preferred drama or com- 
edy. 

“I’d like to alternate between 
the two,” she said, “but if I had 
to make a definite choice I hon- 
estly don’t know what it would 
be. So as long as the weekly 
check keeps coming, I’ll take 
what the studio gives me.” 





Wayne Morris Realizes 
Two Life-Long Wishes 


Wayne Morris satisfied two 
long-standing ambitions yester- 
day in one 
crashing 
achieve- 
ment. He 
drove a Rolls 
Royce limou- 
sine through 
a brick wall. 

Ever since 
he has been 
able to drive 
an automo- 





bile, Morris 

has yearned 

Mat 108—15c to pilot a 
Wayne Morris Rolls Royce 


(as who 
hasn’t?). And for just as long, 
he has cherished the carefully 
suppressed desire to crash a car 
full tilt into a wall. 

The answer to his dreams 
came in a scene of Warner 
Bros.’ “Brother Rat and a 
Baby.” The wall was a “break- 
away” of imitation bricks, but 
the car was a real Rolls Royce. 

A stunt driver was engaged 
for the feat, but Wayne pleaded 
with such earnestness that the 
studio relented. As no real dan- 
ger was involved, the stunt man 
was paid his fee, and Wayne 
was allowed to do the crash. 


Just a Pair of Janes 


Jane Bryan and Jane Wyman 
will remain a couple of Janes. 
They’ve both vetoed Warner 
Bros.’ studio suggestion that 
one of them change her name 
to avoid confusion. 


Knit One, Rip Two 
Is Hollywood Way 


It’s too late now, but Pris- 
cilla Lane and Jane Wyman 
might have warned Jessie Bus- 
ley. Miss Busley appears with 
them in “Brother Rat and a 
Baby,” in the part of their 
matronly chaperon, who knits 
sweaters. 

Miss Busley had been taking 
a great deal of pride in the 
sweater she was knitting in the 
picture, and had nearly com- 
pleted it in her spare time. Then 
the blow fell. 

“We'll shoot the opening 
scene now, in the hotel room,” 
said Director Ray Enright. 
“Miss Busley, you’re in it. And, 
oh yes, will you unravel that 
sweater down to just an inch 
or two?” 


Two Hobbies In One 


Eddie Albert, one of the stars 
of “Brother Rat and a Baby”, 
is planning to 
combine hob- 
bies by pho- 
tographing a 
feature 
length color 
movie based 
on his mis- 
adventures 
as a novice 
yachtsman. 

Albert is 
almost as 
rabid a cam- 
era enthusi- 
ast as he is 
sailor. He has 
made some rather remarkable 
shots during his solitary cruises. 





Mat 109—15c 
Eddie Albert 


Film Scene Was Just 
Like Auto Show 


Wayne Morris was to jump 
into an automobile for a scene 
in “Brother Rat and a Baby.” 
He arrived on the set and, after 
a rehearsal, jumped into the 
front seat while the camera 
turned. But Director Enright 
detected a certain abstraction on 
Wayne’s part. 

“What’s the matter?” he in- 
quired. 

“Well, you see,” said Wayne, 
“this seems to be a new 1940 
model, and I can’t help noticing 
a new feature every time I jump 
in.” 


_ Baby Goes Hollywood 


Movies have had their effect 
on Peter B. Good, 14-month in- 
fant who is featured in the new 
Warner Bros. film, “Brother Rat 
and a Baby.” The mainstays of 
his vocabulary are now “mama,” 
“papa,” “ackshun,” “cut? and 
‘“ ’gain.” 

The last three are movie 
studio acquisitions. He learned 
to echo them after Ray Enright 
who directed the picture. 


Eternal Triangle 


Peter B. Good, the 14-month- 
old baby of Warner Bros.’ 
“Brother Rat and a Baby,” had 
been having wardrobe fittings. 
Milo Anderson, the designer, 
told Peter’s screen father, Eddie 
Albert, that the baby will have 
16 changes. 

“Yeah,” cracked Albert, “and 
they’ll all be some of those 
eternal triangles.” 


[7] 


Arthur Treacher Can’t 
Lose Butler Stamp 


Arriving on the “Brother Rat 
and a Baby” set for a nine 
o’clock call, 
As ret heer 
Treacher was 
informed he 
wouldn’t be 
needed until 
after noon. 
So he set out 
on a tour of 
the lot to 
“see pictures 
made.” 

At the en- 
trance to the 
“Dr. Ehrlich” 
stage he was 
stopped by 
the doorman asking for a pass. 

“T beg your pawhdon sir,” said 
Treacher, “but I have no pass.” 

“What do you do, and who do 
you want to see?” persisted the 
doorman. 

“By occupation, sir,’ said 
Treacher, in his best profession- 
al manner, “I am a butler. I wish 
to see Mr. Robinson on a matter 
of business. I hear that he is 
looking for a new butler.” 

Deciding only a real butler 
could act the part so well, the 
doorman passed him through. 





Mat 106—15c 
Arthur Treacher 


Phi Gam Sweetheart 


Jane Bryan, Warner Bros.’ 
screen actress, has been named 
“sweetheart” of the Phi Gamma 
Delta fraternity at the Univer- 
sity of California at Los An- 
geles. The star’s brother, 
Jimmy, is a member of the fra- 
ternity which chose her. 


Film Director Turns 
Score-Keeper 


Wayne Morris and Priscilla 
Lane were having difficulties 
with their lines and timing for 
an involved scene of Warner 
Bros.’ “Brother Rat and a 
Baby.” First Wayne would 
blow up in a take and then it 
would be Priscilla’s turn to 
miss. Finally, Director Ray En- 
right put them through a re- 
hearsal and thought he had 
them straightened out. On the 
next take, however, Wayne 
again missed his lines. 

“I’m so mixed up” he ex- 
ploded, “I don’t even know what 
the score is.” 

“T do,” snapped Enright. “It’s 
Morris 3, Warner Bros. 0.” 


Keeps His Kiss Count 


Ronald Reagan and Jane 
Wyman were playing a roman- 
tic scene for 
W.:a r-n-e 7r 
Be odin. 
“Brother Rat 
and a Baby” 
WwW. Desa 
started and 
ended with a 
kiss. Between 
osculations, 
Reagan was 
to say, “that 
makes 16 
kisses this 
evening. I 
counted 
them.” 

After the second take, Direc- 
tor Ray Enright okayed the 
scene. “Hey,” protested Reagan, 
“T’ve got 12 kisses to go.” 





Mat 104—15c 
Ronald Reagan 









An Interview With Peter B. Good, 14 Months Old Star 
Of the Comedy ‘Brother Rat and A Baby’ 


As Told To BILL RICE 


When I grow up, I’m going 
to be a cowboy or a fireman. 
Right now I’m just a movie 
star. 

It’s supposed to be nice work 
if you can get it, but I’m sure 
I am going to want something 
more exciting. I do _ hope, 
though, that I can hang onto 
my job until Mom gets through 
cosmetic school. 

Things haven’t been so good 
for her and Pop lately. Pop 
used to have a fine job before 
I was born. Then a lot of things 
I don’t understand made us 
poor. But I’ve never had to miss 
my milk, even when times were 
hardest. That’s one reason I’m 
the family breadwinner now. 
I’m disgustingly healthy. 

I know, because I heard a 
woman tell Mom that was the 
reason Warner Bros. picked me 
instead of her darling as the 
baby of “Brother Rat and a 
Baby.” It made Mom awful 
mad, because she thinks my 
good looks and personality got 
the job. 

Just between us, I think 
they’re both wrong, even though 
the other woman was more 
right than Mom. I got the job 
because I like to slam doors 
and because my hair stands 
straight up in the middle of my 
head. 

I like to open and slam doors 
even better than I like to play 
with my cowboy doll. That’s a 


lot of liking. So when Mom took 
me to a place where there were 
lots of lovely doors, I just 
slipped down off her lap and 
went into action. 

Finally I heard Mom calling, 
“Peter!” And it sounded like 
she meant it. So I started back, 
slamming the doors behind me. 





When I got back into the room 
where I’d left Mom, I gave the 
door an extra hard slam. It was 
the last one. 

There was a man standing 
there with Mom. The other 
women and babies had gone. 
Mom looked pretty mad, and I 
knew I was in for trouble. The 
man didn’t look mad though. 

“Is that your baby?” he 
asked Mom sort of peculiarly. 


I’min 


o-oh! Am | 
the Movies Now! 


Mom sounded sort of apolo- 
getic when she said “yes,” but 
the man didn’t notice, he was 
looking at my hair. 

“He seems to have a lot of 
energy,” the man said. ‘Does 
his hair always stand up like 
that?” 

Mom said she was afraid it 
did. 

“Well,” the man said, “I think 
we'll give him a screen test. 
Maybe he’s the baby we’re look- 
ine. for.” 

That’s how I got the job. I 
knew why the man asked about 
my hair when I saw Eddie AlI- 
bert, the nice star who plays 
my Pop in the picture. His hair 
stands up on end like my kitty’s 
does when she sees the neigh- 
bor’s dog. 

And you ought to see the 
wonderful freckles Jane Bryan, 
my screen Mom, has. They’re 
real, too. I tried to pull one off. 
It wouldn’t come off. 

I learned a lot of things about 
movies that Mama never told 
me. How to steal scenes, for 
instance. Of course, I know its 
not right to steal things like 
toys or candy, but it’s all right 
to steal scenes. Mr. Ray En- 
right, the director-man who 
tells everybody in the picture 
what to do, told me it’s not 
naughty to steal scenes. It’s 
very easy once you catch on to 
it, too. Like one day, my screen 
mother and father and Mr. 
Arthur Treacher, who is the 
tallest man I ever saw, were all 
supposed to be talking and Mr. 
Treacher was being very funny. 
I was just sitting there, but 
pretty soon I felt like talking, 





Excited! 


(Left) I had a swell time on the set with 
my screen mom, Jane Bryan, who sure is 
a nifty looker. (Right) Now don’t get 

the idea that I’m a sissy, ’cause even 

Wayne Morris had to have Pere West- 
more comb his hair—that’s how it is 

when you’re in the movies. 





















































too, so I did. Then there was 
another time when Jane Wyman 
was doing all the acting. Well, 
Jane is awfully pretty, you 
know, and I was afraid nobody 
was going to look at me with 
her around so I just took off 
my cap and held it up in front 
of her face. See how simple it 
is? 

My screen Mom and Pop are 
awful nice to me. They give me 
toys and Eddie lets me listen 
to his watch. He didn’t even 
get mad when I dropped it on 
the floor. Everyone is nice, and 
it makes me happy my real 
Mom and Pop brought me to 
America. 

That’s where I would have 
chosen to be born. But a baby 
hasn’t got any say about such 
things. I was born in Basle, 
Switzerland. 

We have been here in Holly- 
wood four months and every- 
one has been kind, even if Pop 
hasn’t been able to find a steady 
job. I think the neighbors are 
the nicest people in the world, 
because they are always telling 
Mom how cute I am. 

One day, the lady next door 
told Mom she had read in the 
paper that Warner Bros. was 
looking for a baby to work in 
“Brother Rat and a Baby.” She 
took Mom and me in her auto- 
mobile to the place where I had 
so much fun with the doors. 

And that’s my story. It will 
be a lot more exciting, I know, 
when I grow up to be a cowboy. 





Sometimes a fellow just gets tired, even if he is a movie star! 





o-Col. Mat of Art Only Available—Order “Mat BB 502-B”—75ec from Campaign Plan Editor 


[8] 


“BROTHER RAT AND A BABY”’—CURRENT PUBLICITY 


PIII III III IDI SI IAI ASSIA SAAS A AAAS AAAS AA SASAAAA SAAS SISA ASSIS SSIS SSSI SASSI SISK IA SASS SSAA AAAI A AAA SAA AA SAAS AAAS SAAS SASASSS SASS SS SSSSSSSSSICSACSCSSICSACSSCN 


Far-Off Places Beckon 
Strongly to Eddie Albert 


Eddie Albert is afraid he'll 
climb aboard a sailing schooner 
one of these fine days and cruise 


right away from a_ lucrative — 


screen career. He’ll be alone, 
and once he hoists anchor, he 
won’t drop it until he reaches 
Tahiti. 

Strangely enough, it isn’t the 
thought of leaving picture work, 
and the attractive salary that 
goes with it, which worries 
Albert. It’s the idea of playing 
truant from another and more 
serious type of vacation. 

If he doesn’t set sail for Ta- 
hiti, he’ll go to a farm in New 
England and get started on the 
writing he has been planning to 
do ever since he left college. 

“T have a two or three months 
vacation coming to me,” Albert 
explained on the “Brother Rat 
and a Baby” set at Warner 
Bros. “I intend to take it this 
winter. I should head right for 
that farmhouse I’ve been talk- 
ing and dreaming about, and 
get to writing before my ambi- 
tion becomes dulled. 

“But I’ve become slightly 
crazy about boats and sailing. 
For the first time in my life, 
I’ve found a way to relax. I get 
out on my boat alone and noth- 
ing seems to matter. I even for- 
get time. Last week-end I set 
out for Catalina late Saturday 
night. I was gone four days, 
and scarcely realized it.” 

Albert’s present boat is a 387- 


foot yawl. If he decides to set 
sail for Tahiti, he’ll buy a larger, 
better equipped craft, but one 
he can handle alone. 

If he answers the call of the 
sea, Albert knows he’ll have to 
postpone the start of his writ- 
ing for another year or two, 
possibly longer. There will be 
picture assignments waiting for 
him at Warner Bros. when he 
returns to Hollywood, and there 
will be offers of plays to reluct- 
antly refuse. He has turned 
down three such offers in the 
past six months, while he has 
been appearing in the movies, 
“On Your Toes” and “Four 
Wives.” 

“And if I keep putting off my 
writing I’m afraid it will go the 
way of those great American 
novels my newspaper friends 
are always going to do,” he 
said. “I’ll decide the things I 
want to say aren’t so important 
after all, and that they prob- 
ably won’t add anything to the 
sum of human happiness.” 

“T’ll be correct in that de- 
cision, no doubt, but that isn’t 
the vital thing. If I do go soft 
and give up my ambition to 
write, I’ll be doing something 
to myself. I’ll always feel I’ve 
been considerable of a failure.” 

It was rather strange to hear 
a chap who has won stardom on 
both stage and screen talk about 
being a failure, but Albert’s 
that sort of a guy. 









It’s a long lane that has no 
turning, and that applies to Pris- 
cilla Lane as much as to what- 
ever lane the author of the 
maxim had in mind. Though by 
no means the ugly duckling of 
the Lane family, Priscilla has 
more or less enjoyed that status 
in her screen career until very 
recently. When she and her 
sister, Rosemary, accompanied 
Fred Waring’s band to Holly- 





Mat 102—15c 
PRISCILLA LANE 





wood to participate in the War- 
ner musical, “Varsity Show,” it 
was Rosemary who held all the 
aces. Rosemary was considered 
the prettier of the two; Rose- 
mary was rated the _ better 
actress, and it was Rosemary 
who was given the femme lead 
opposite Dick Powell in the pic- 
ture. Priscilla, who was a mem- 
ber of the supporting cast, was 
known as “the funny looking” 
Lane. That was two years ago. 
Then, lo and behold, Priscilla’s 
fairy godmother put in an ap- 
pearance and turned her pump- 


PRISCILLA LANE 


- A Personal Portrait - 


kins into golden carriages. 
Exactly what happened to re- 
verse the situation so completely 
no one knew. Was it because 
Priscilla had blossomed from a 
gangly, funny-faced 19-year-old 
kid into a lovely young lady, as 


so often happens? The _ best 
theory is that Priscilla isn’t the 
startling beauty type with whom 
men fall in love at first sight. 
Priscilla grows on you. One by 
one, you become cognizant of 
her numerous superior qualities, 
her fresh-blown wholesomeness, 
her sincerity and _ straightfor- 
wardness, the depth of emotion 
in her eyes, her generosity of 
spirit and her ebullient nature. 

The first suspicion that Pris- 
cilla “had something” came 
when she co-starred with Wayne 
Morris in “Love, Honor and Be- 
have.” The suspicion grew 
stronger—very much stronger— 
when she played the feminine 
lead in “Cowboy from Brook- 
lyn.” The suspicion was defi- 
nitely and finally confirmed in 
“Four Daughters,” when Pris- 
cilla wrapped up the picture 
and walked away with it. 

Priscilla’s nickname is “Pat.” 
It was given to her by Rose- 
mary as a child, because she had 
difficulty in pronouncing “Pris- 
cilla.” 

She’s just as cute and whole- 
some off the screen as she is 
on. She doesn’t drink and she 
doesn’t use makeup except for a 
bit of lip rouge and nail polish. 

She hates night clubs and 
parties and all things that are 
formal. She loves mystery and 
adventure stories, and loves to 
frighten herself at night with 
blood-curdling thrillers. She also 
reads every book on horses she 
can obtain. 

Priscilla’s own description of 
herself is, “I’m the girl that 
looks as if she’d stepped out of 
a shower and was in a hurry 
afterward.” 


roacrceet asec inne 


spe 
ee 
2 


oe 





Still BB 26; Mat 206—30c 


GIRL WITH GLASSES PREPARES FOR A PASS — Priscilla Lane (right) 
“glamors up" girl friend Jane Wyman for a big romantic moment in their 
current film comedy, "Brother Rat and a Baby," now showing at the Strand. 





‘Girls Can Be Glamorous 
In Glasses’—Jane Wyman 


Jane Wyman, who has to wear 
glasses again for her role in 
“Brother Rat and a Baby,” the 
sequel to “Brother Rat,” passes 
on some good tips from Perc 
Westmore for girls who every 
day are proving that whoever 
said “men never make passes at 
girls who wear glasses” was 
wrong. 

Jane has no trouble in snar- 
ing Ronald Reagan nor is she 
lacking in fatal glamour. 

“The girl who wears ‘specs’,” 
Jane says, “should wear her hair 
completely off her brow and 
away from the sides of her 
face. 

“Eyebrows should follow as 
closely as possible the line of 
her glasses—Marlene Dietrich’s 
bird-wing brows would never do 
—and eye lashes should be 
heavily made up for evening but 
conservatively for daytime. Nor 
should she put mascara on lower 
lashes. 

“She’s allowed eye shadow to 
blend with coloring and eyes in 
the evening, may smooth it high, 
and may, if she wishes, use a 
little on the lids only for day- 
time wear. But she should never 
put shadow on heavily as shad- 
ows are cast by glasses. 


Baby Film Star Born 


In Movie Theatre 


Peter B. Good, the baby who 
has won screen stardom at the 
age of 14 months, was born in 
a motion picture theatre. 

That dramatic coincidence be- 
tween Peter’s worldly debut and 
his present position as the in- 
fant star of Warner Bros.’ 
“Brother Rat and a Baby” was 
revealed recently by his mother, 
Mrs. Helen Good. 

A Basle, Switzerland, theatre 
was Peter’s birthplace, accord- 
ing to Mrs. Good. The baby was 
not expected for another two 
weeks, and she had gone to see 
a movie. She was stricken dur- 
ing the showing of the picture. 
Fellow members of the audience 
startled by the sight of a woman 
being carried backstage would 
have been surprised indeed 
could they have known they 
were witnessing the first chap- 
ter in the career of a future 
film star. Incidentally, in Peter’s 
first film role, he continues his 
record for doing inopportune 


09] 





“Wear clothes with a sparkle, 
beads or sequins, to highlight 
eyes and hair. If she does wear 
a plain garment, she must high- 
light it with a bright flower or 
touch of some kind, but nothing 
too heavy or frilly around the 
neckline. 

“Never wear hats that hug 
the forehead. Off-the-face tur- 
bans and halo hats were meant 
for the girl with glasses. Chic 
sailors that expose the hair and 
brow on one side are also good, 
or profile berets. 

“She should never decorate 
her hair with bunches of flowers 
or too much frou-frou. A simple 
evening bow if not too flighty or 
large is permissable. 

“Tf she’s clever about it, she 
can make her glasses a piquant 
part of her particular person- 
ality. And she doesn’t need me 
to tell her that there are mo- 
ments in every girl’s life when 
it’s less important to see than 
to be seen, and for those mo- 
ments, she can always find a 
casual, easy way to take off her 
glasses and twirl them about 
in her hand. But for the most 
part, she’ll look a lot more at- 
tractive wearing her glasses 
than she would squinting with- 
out them.” 


we 


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Advance Tips on 
Spring Fashions 
In Strand Film 


To dress three blondes—Jane 
Wyman, Priscilla Lane and Jane 
Bryan—with three different per- 
sonalities was a problem of Milo 
Anderson, designer of the ward- 
robe for Warner Bros.’ “Brother 
Rat and a Baby,” now showing 
at the Strand. 

In designing the clothes for 
Jane Wyman, one of the blondes 
with a personality that’s effer- 
vescent, Milo had to mind ad- 
monitions about “girls who wear 
glasses,” since Jane had to put 
hers back on again for the 
sequel to “Brother Rat.” Con- 
sequently her clothes are simple. 

In Jane’s own estimation the 
cutest outfit in the whole lot is 
an evening sweater and chiffon 
skirt. The sweater is embroid- 
ered in sequins with one sequin 
breast pocket matched in two 
larger ones on the skirt. 

Priscilla wears a number of 
poke bonnets, which gives some 
presage of what’s “to be” in 
spring chapeaux. An _ evening 
gown with off-shoulder neckline 
and wide dirndl belt proves too 
that these two trends are still 
very much in the running. 

Purses are being matched to 
everything now as witness Pris- 
cilla’s suit with yoke in small 
check matched with a checked 
purse. She’s going to follow this 
idea in a navy serge dress for 
early spring with red and white 
gingham yoke and gingham 
purse. 

Jane Bryan, whom most peo- 
ple term a girl with a person- 
ality that’s affectionate, wears 
clothes as simple as simplicity 
itself. One practical frock that 
is becoming to school girl, busi- 
ness miss, or she who lists mar- 
riage as a career is in striped 
silk with plain white collar, cuffs 
and belt. Jane wears something 
too that she favors in her own 
wardrobe—a white tailored suit, 
worn with straw Chinese coolie 
hat in brilliant pink. 





’Twould Be Small Loss 


Eddie Albert was supposed to 
have a twenty-five cent piece in 
his mouth for a scene of Warner 
Bros.’ “Brother Rat and a Baby,” 
and the property man produced 
the quarter. “But what,” pro- 
tested Albert, “if I accidentally 
swallow it?” 

“Oh, that’s all right,” said the 
prop man. “It’s a phoney.” 


FIFI IAAI IIA AAAI IA AIA IIA ASA ASDA SAA SAAS SDS SASS A SAAS AAS AA ADS 





8 A 


ae 





FIND PETER B. GOOD'S DOUBLE 


Everybody loves a baby and when that baby is movie star Peter 
B. Good a local baby resemblance contest is in order. Proud 
parents submit pictures of their babies with prizes going to those 
which look most like Peter B. Good. Pick up scene mat 201 of Peter 
on page 6 as your guide. If you think you can take care of them, 
have the parents bring the babies instead of the photos for judg- 
ing. Contact paper to cover this massing of town's babyhood. 


MOST BEAUTIFUL BABY CONTEST 


A "must" on your exploitation list for this picture. Tie up with the 
local newspaper to run entry blanks and publicity stories and with 
the photography store for special rates and window displays. Make 
the stunt bigger by tying in the town merchants for promoted 
prizes. Display all entries in your lobby with final judging being 
done there or from stage one night during run of picture. 


FIND TOWN'S PERFECT BABY 


How about finding ''Blanktown's Perfect Baby?" Tie in with the 
local nursing home, 4-H Club, etc., in sponsoring the contest. 
Final judging should be done one night during your run of 
"Brother Rat and a Baby" in the lobby of the theatre with as many 
prominent localites on the board of judges as possible. Ring in 
the local newspaper for publicity and pictures of the contest. 





Wa 


Get that baby atmosphere in and 
around your theatre. String diapers, 
spelling out picture title, from your 
theatre marquee to building across 
the street. Baby dolls wrapped in 
diapers and hung from marquee will 
prove a sure attention-getter. Inside 
the lobby string clotheslines carrying 
baby garments, diapers, etc. 


HONOR BABY BORN ON PLAYDATE 


Honor the first baby born during your playdate with set of prizes 
promoted from local merchants—layette, medical supplies, bank 
account, etc. Contributed prizes are displayed in theatre lobby 
prior to opening with credits while stores take ads plugging 
merchandise and picture. Photo of mother receiving “congratu- 
latory telegrams" from picture stars is good for newspaper plant. 


NO ENDORSEMENTS 
Peter B. Good’s name or photograph 


CANNOT be used for any “Brother Rat 
and A Baby” tie-ups whatsoever. 





B Y 


L_——$$$—— 





ys | 


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15,000 MILK BOTTLE HANGERS carried copy on 
showing. “Milk for Baby” slant was used in copy 
plugging film. 


| 


ss : aa B 


FOR MEN ONLY was the speed diapering contest, won 
by a bachelor who invented a zipper diaper. Loads of 
breaks on this stunt. 





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* 


Baby Parade Starts Your 
Campaign Going 


How about getting your campaign under way 
with a baby parade? You know all the fixin's— 
town officials, brass bands, floats, board of 
judges, promoted prizes, etc. Give the parents 
a chance to show off their brood. They love it! 


Junior's ‘Bright Sayings’ 
Lobby or Paper Contest 


Use junior's "bright sayings'' as the basis of a 
contest during your run of the show. Award 
guest tickets each day to the three most clever 
quips submitted by the doting parents. Use best 
for lobby or get paper to print winners. 





4 eg” SES SS tue 8+ 





Kansas City 'Child' Stunts Grea 


Choose "1940 Baby” 


Honor City's Oldest Bab 


One-Sheets on Diaper Se 


Milk-Bottle Hangers—A 


- 


Diapering Speed Contes: 


Department Store Tie-u; 


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imprint Pap 
For Teaser 


Effective teaser gag for 
to imprint quantities of 
available at all drug st 
reads: "Hold on... + 
Rat—with a bang—and 
and a Baby’ at the Str 
date)."' Tack on telegra 
boards, and use for a no 


Sponsor Bene 
For Baby 


Contact local baby mil 
etc., about staging ben 
connection with showin 
builder-upper, announce 
one matinee showing wi 


TWG 


On your right: Som 
your lobby just as t% 
noise he makes the ! 
down the main stree 
sounds a horn attac. 
crowds—and, incide1 





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it for ‘Brother Rat and A Baby’ 





»y Doctor 


$$» 


ervice Trucks 


$$$  __» 


‘Natural! 


rs 


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yer Diapers 
r Sniping 


‘ sniping around town is 
f these paper diapers 
tores. Copy on diaper 
dere come the Brother 
1 a BABY! ‘Brother Rat 
rand Theatre on (play- 
aph poles, fences, bill- 
ovel mailing piece. 


efit Showing 
| Charity 


lk fund, orphan home, 
efit at your theatre in 
g. Or, as a good will 
> that proceeds from 


ll go to these charities. 


2 Pictures and feature stories of city's oldest 
e 


3 Diaper-service trucks carried one-sheets, 
e 


4 Milk delivery service co-operates with 
e 


5 For men only. Fastest male "diaperer" was 
e 


4 Local department store tie-up: Ribbons 
® 


1 Committee of nurses chooses baby to be 

e named "New Year, 1940." Sponsored by 
Kansas City STAR with daily stories. $50 
award to winner. All news services carry 
winner's story and photos of "New Year, 
1940."' Newsreels too. And radio. 


doctor, age 88. (He delivered 8,000 babies 
in his career.) Guest at premiere and posed 
with Baby Winner. 


also distributed heralds. Other "baby tie- 
ups'; nursery furniture, baby clothes—with 
window displays, etc. 


bottle-hanger plugging "Milk for Baby" 
angle. Playdate on 15,000 of them! 


a bachelor! He invented a zipper diaper 
for the occasion. Plenty of photo breaks on 
this. Do it, too! 


plugging show worn by salespeople and 
floorwalkers. Elevator operators announced: 
“Infants wear on 5th floor. See . . ." pic- 
ture and theatre. 


OOOO UC OUOO.OO.AOOOOO.OO OOO OO OE 


Contest for Candid Camera 
Baby Poses 


Candid camera shots of babies at play, asleep, 
eating, etc., furnish you with the makings of a 
swell contest. Any informal, unposed picture 
where a baby is the subject is eligible for judg- 
ing. Tie in with local photography supply houses 
and newspaper for cooperation. The judging, of 
course, is done in the theatre. 


Identify Town Prominents 
From Their Baby Pix 


Get pictures of town prominents as babies and 
use for newspaper or lobby contest. Idea is to 
identify people from their childhood picture 
and an accompanying caption. Stunt can be 
built big through cooperation of local news- 
paper and localites involved. 


; BALLYHOO ‘MUSTS' 


e “playful” kid sitting in some conspicuous spot in 
‘e show breaks will be a swell eye-grabber. The more 
better. On your left: Proud “pappy” wheels his son 


ets of town. Banners on carriage sell show. “Dad’’ 
‘hed to carriage to help him get through the street 


ntally, attract attention. 


ee ee en am Motions ana 


SEE 


PETER B.GO0D 
IN 





TWO BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Birth announcement cards are printed locally for general distribu- 
tion. Same copy can be used for spots in the birth announcement 
column of town newspaper. 


Mr. and Mrs. “Brother Rat’ 
(Eddie Albert and Jane Bryan) 
are happy to announce 
the birth of a son, 
Commencement 
Godparents: Wayne Morris and Priscilla Lane 
Ronald Reagan and Jane Wyman 
in 
“Brother Rat and a Baby’ 
at the 
Strand Theatre 
on 


(playdate) 





Or instead of formal announcements, use this gag card: 


It?s A Boy 
For Brother Rat! 


. and, oh boy, what a baby! 


‘“‘Brother Rat and a Baby” 
at the 
Strand Theatre 
on 


(playdate) 





CHECK BABY IN LOBBY 





Announce that a registered nurse will be present at your theatre 
to care for babies while parents attend show. Corner of lobby or 
theatre lounge, if available, can be used. Tie up with local mer- 
chants to supply toys, blankets, play cribs, etc. 


TWO STUNTS WITH BABY’S NAME 


Peter B. Good's screen name is "Commencement," so-called be- 
cause he was born just as his "'pop,'' Eddie Albert, was to be 
graduated from V. M. I. You can tie in on this name angle with 
either of these two gags: (I). Letters from parents of children with 
unusual names and origin of such nomens; (2). Lobby poll to de- 
termine which names are most popular. See what you can do with 
first names of stars of picture. 





Step Out and Make Some 


: FOO III OSI IOI IOI IOI IOI I IDI DIDI NINI AAA AIS 


1. ‘Baby Answers Back’ 
Newspaper Contest 


Contest is based on the familiar questions we all had 
put to us when we were kids. Idea is for contestants to 
frame their own answers along the lines of the samples 
given each day. Whimsical wisecracks and use of the 
baby, always a human-interest angle for newspapers, 
makes this five-day contest easier to plant and a swell 
builder-upper for your showing. 





Order “BB Contest Mats 501B°’ — 7ic — from 
Campaign Plan Editor, 321 W. 44th Street, N.Y. C. 


(Publicity Story) 


Here's your chance to tell them off 
with just the answer you would give 
those cute folks who ask silly questions 
and know very well baby cannot talk. 

Now if you were a baby and could 
talk what would you say if someone 
asked you, for example: "What's the 
matter little boy, did you lose your 
tongue?" For your answers to five of 
these questions the Strand Theatre, in 
collaboration with the Daily News, is of- 
fering free tickets to the new picture, 
"Brother Rat and a Baby," which comes 


First Day: “Go ahead, baby, give your uncle a great big kiss.’ 


to the Strand next Friday. 

Every day this week, starting today, 
the Daily News will print a scene from 
the picture in which somebody appears 
to be asking Peter B. Good, the baby in 
the picture, one of the age-old ques- 
tions put to babies. All you have to do 
is give Peter a whimsical answer along 
the lines of the suggested sample also 
given. 

Save all your answers until you have 
the complete set of five, then send them 
in to the Daily News Contest Editor. 





9 


(Sample answer: “Tsk, tsk, the things some kids have to put up 


with.” ) 





Second Day: “What are you, a little boy or a little girl?” (Sample 
answer: *“‘Haw! what a question.’’) 


C12] 





Third Day: “How would you like to have a little baby sister, 
Snookums?” (Sample answer: “It’s okay with me, but not one like 
this dummy.’’) 





Fourth Day: “Say hello to your daddy, snookie.” (Sample answer: 
“Pt-t-t-t’—for the unenlightened that’s a Bronx cheer.) 





Fifth Day: “What do you want to be when you grow up, my little 
man?” (Sample answer: “A traffic cop, and quit pushing me around, 
mugg!’’) 


Noise With These Contests! 


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+ 


2. a) Does Your Baby Resemble Any of the Film’s Stars? 
b) Can You Identify These Stars From Their Baby Pictures? 





PRISCILLA LANE 


JANE BRYAN 


WAYNE MORRIS 


RONALD REAGAN 


a). Newspaper prints a different star's baby pic- 
ture each day. Idea is for contestants to send in 
pictures of their babies who resemble any star. 
Closest resemblances win prizes, mothers get 
passes, etc. Tag-line: "Does your baby look like 
this baby picture of Priscilla Lane?" 


b). Using the same pictures of the stars as babies, 
get your patron contestants to establish the iden- 
tities of the stars by the clues which you give 
each day. Plant contest in local paper or use in 
lobby. (Pick up clues from the "Can You Name 
These Brother Rat Stars" contest below.) 


For mats order “BB Contest Mat 301B°—45ce—trom Warner 
Bros. Campaign Plan Editor, 321 W. 44th St., New York City. 


If you want the stills, order JB Pub Als7x. PL Pub X. WM 
Pub AGI and RE Pub X from the Campaign Editor, 10c each. 


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x 


3. Publicity Scenes Do Double Duty — 
Use for Star Identification Contest 


"Can You Name These Stars From Brother Rat and a Baby'?" Using 
this tag-line, you've got an easy five-day contest for movie fans. 
All they have to do is identify the stars from the clues given below 
five scene photos from picture. 


Pick up the publicity scene mats on pages indicated. 


(First Day) 


This star hails from Indianola, Iowa . . . original name, Mulli- 
can... sang with Fred Warings’ Pennsylvanians . . . first 
Hollywood picture, “Varsity Show.” Should be a cinch now. 
Who is it? 

(Mat 205—on page 5. Correct answer—Priscilla Lane) 


(Second Day ) 


The person in this group we’re thinking of is a native Holly- 
woodian whose father is an attorney. Came to films from Jean 
Muir’s theatrical workshop. Best tip: Created a sensation in 
“The Old Maid.” Can you name the star? 

(Mat 203—on page 6. Correct answer—Jane Bryan) 


(Third Day) 
One of these three was a Broadway musical comedy star before 
going to Hollywood to do “Brother Rat.” Now is in “Brother 
Rat and a Baby.” This University of Minnesota graduate is on 
the way to Hollywood’s top flight. Know who it is? 
(Mat 202—on page 7. Correct answer—Eddie Albert) 


(Fourth Day ) 
One of these two pretty gals in a scene from “Brother Rat and 
a Baby” calls St. Joseph, Missouri, her home town. Blues 
singer and model first, was snapped up by Hollywood and is 
now engaged to a player in the picture’s cast. Who is she? 
(Mat 206—on page 9. Correct answer—Jane Wyman) 


(Fifth Day) 
One of this merry group is from Tampico, Illinois, and was a 
pretty popular person at Eureka College. Did plenty of radio 
broadcasting in Des Moines before being picked up by the 
movies. Recently completed tour with other stars, and is now 
in “Brother Rat and a Baby.” 
(Mat 301—on page 4. Correct answer—Ronald Reagan) 


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[13] 






Preece i mao eceniareaneimnanS 


ANIMATED DISPLAY 
FOR LOBBY 


Set large compo stork in front of cut- 
out of stars taken from six-sheet. 
Stork carries in mouth baby doll 
wrapped in diaper. Diaper and doll 
are animated to swing back and forth 
pendulum-fashion. Run _ picture bill- 
ing and playdate at bottom of display. 


3-Dimensional Idea 
From 3-Sheet 





Use the three-sheet for this three-plane 

lobby display. First plane consists of cut- 

out of baby mounted atop boarding 

carrying billing. Behind baby set heads 

of stars in semi-circle. Title lettering 

takes up third plane. Light entire display 
from front with baby spot. 


iS 
STREET STUNT TAKEN 


FROM AD BLOW-UPS 











(THEATRE AND 


‘Real Things’ Display 
Board 





THOSE TROUBLE-MAKING, MERRY-MAKING BROTHER RATS 
AQE ON THE LOOSE AGAIN!... SE 


“BROTHER RAT... BABY’ 


AT THE Sand... ALL NEXT WEEK! 
Coming PRISCIUA LANE, WAYNE MOROS, JANE BAYAN , EDDIE Al- 
BENY, JANE WYMAN, RONALD REAGAN and PETER B.Goop 





THe GOop MONEY (HE FarHe03) 
THAT Mandap WAYNE MOORS 


SPENT AT COLLEGE ' 


THE RING THAT YOUNG 
PETER Smuattows: AND FOR_ 
Whew HE IS KEW Fou Bagor | 


r 


3c 
IZ. 
(CEP XS 


THE SmaAnnaniuS WOLIN 
AFTER PETER GoT THROU 
DLAYING (artH) IT HEI! 








WHAT DETEZ USED To WANA, 


€ 
‘AA YD HG House! (THEY SAL - 


VAGED THE CHIMNEY! ) 


ae aoe 


WIRE THAT Gor THE EDDIE 


ALBERT FAMILY A SB, AND SET 
OFF THE WELT Goo CHASE IN 
Wis tony! 








THE CORN THAT PETER_ 
Swaccowso. THIS TE ALL 
HE GE BACK Was 1S 


Growawe AMERICA —_ now IN A Hoek Sto! 
CENTS Chance!!! 3 Mss LTO Se 


Display of real things ties in with actual 
comedy sequences from the picture. Set 
board in some conspicuous spot in your lobby 








PETER BECOMES THE 
Countiy'S YOUNGEST 














SPARc URE UsEO BY 
PETER'S FAMILY WHILE 
TRAVELING ! 





. 
Se 
REPMESENTING ALL OF THE 
EDWARDS’ WoRLOLY Gooot 


where everybody will see it. 


Blow-ups of line drawings from ad mat 302 are mounted on 
sandwich signs for three pretty theatre attendants to parade 
down the streets of town. Instead of blowing up the draw- 


ings, you can have your artist copy them. 


Turn to the “Baby Stuff” spread 
for additional lobby and street 


eye-catchers to get across the 
baby angle. On pages 10 and II. 








C14] 


MORE "BROTHER 


Av, 








BALLYHOO BELL-RINGERS! 


Dee oO @ 6 @.0.0,0.0,0,0,9.0,9,0,0,0,0,0.0,9.0,9,0,.0,0,0,0,9,0,.0,.0,.0,9.9.0,.0,.0,.0,0,0,0,0,.0,.0.0.0.0.1 0.0.9.9.9.0.00.9.0.0.00.0.0 0.000.000.0090 00.06.0600 60000 5 60 0 0 2 8 0 oo 





PLAYDATE) 


Ad Blow-Up Makes 
This Attention-Getter 





2B DOK BATS 
POE TRONER BATE 
S Ree 


Some rearranging of layout and you 
have a swell animated display from 
blow-up of ad mat 402. Reverse title 
billing and baby cutout swing free like 
a pendulum. Star stills are RR 2, JW 3, 
WM 1, PL 1, JB 2,EA 3 and PG Pub Al. 
Order from Campaign Plan Editor 








PII IIA III IIIA AIA AAS AAA AAS ASA SASSI SACS SA ASIA SASS SISA SAI SI AIA AAAS SADA SASSI SI ASIA SAA SAA ASI SI AAA SASSI AA SAA SISA AAAS SISA SSA SISA SSAA ACSA IIA AISA SI KISSD AA AA AK 


It's ‘Sweethearts Night’ 


At Your Theatre 


"It's ‘Sweethearts Night’ at the Strand 
Theatre Tonight."' Use this as your cue line 
in getting sweethearts, old and new, down 
to the theatre. Offer prizes at the theatre 
for the oldest, most attractive, etc. sweet- 
hearts attending. Tip off your newspaper 
editor about picture and feature story 
possibilities. Judging should be done by 
audience in theatre or board of prominent 
townfolk. You might try interviewing the 
couples as they enter theatre. 


Paper Runs Feature on 
‘How I Met My Husband 


Get your local newspaper interested in a 
daily feature: "How | Met My Husband 
(or Wife)" or ‘How He Proposed to Me." 
Tie up with editor to offer free tickets to 
best daily letter on these subjects. Of 
course, if your paper won't go for this you 
can always use it as a lobby-letter contest. 


Offer Tickets to Persons 
Engaged During Playdate 


Offer guest tickets to all couples whose en- 
gagements are announced during your play- 
date. Or if there are none of these, find the 
longest-married sweetheart couples and 
have them down to a showing. Make sure 
you contact your local newspaper for pub- 
licity stories and pictures. 


Contest for Embarrassing 


Moments While on ‘Dates’ 


In the picture, Wayne Morris and Ronald 
Reagan are presented with a bill while out 
on a date and find they haven't enough 
money to cover it. Have you ever been em- 
barrassed like this? Or what other embar- 
rassing moments have happened to you 
when out on dates with the "O. and O.?" 
These are your lead lines for a short letter 
contest. Prizes go to the best letters which 
can be used for lobby display or planted in 
local newspaper. 


Typical Sweetheart 


Couple Vote in Town 


Conduct a vote to find the typical sweet- 
heart couple in your situation. Contact local 
sororities and fraternities, social organiza- 
tions, etc. in the voting. Set up box in your 
lobby for ballots and build large tally board 
where everybody will see it. Vote ends on 
the closing night of your run with winning 
couple on hand as your guests. 


1940 Is Leap Year! 
Girl Takes Boy to Show 


You might tie in the Jane Wyman chases 
Ronald Reagan-Leap Year angles by spon- 
soring a showing where the girl friends take 
the boy friends instead of vice versa. Get 
all local fraternities and sororities and social 
clubs in on this. 





‘Brother Rat’ 
Haircut Tie-Up 


That “Brother Rat’ haircut 


Find Picture Star Names 


In Newspaper Ads 


Spot the names of Wayne Morris, Eddie 
Albert, Ronald Reagan, Priscilla Lane, Jane 
Bryan and Jane Wyman in scattered news- 
paper ads. Idea is to find all six names and 
then match them in sweetheart couples, as 
they appear in the picture. In submitting 
lists, contestants identify ads in which they 
found names. Free tickets or prizes pro- 
moted from merchants involved go to first 
twenty-five sets of correct answers sub- 
mitted to the box-office. 


Sweetheart Photo Contest 
In Your Lobby 


Get those sweetheart photos out of the al- 
bum with your contest for the most beauti- 
ful, the oldest, etc. pictures of husband and 
wife before they were married or newly- 
engaged couples. Use these photos for dis- 
play in your lobby with the final judging 
being done there or from the stage of your 
theatre one night during the run of the 
picture. 


‘Blind Date Bureau’ and 
Park Bench Gags for Show 


And, of course, don't forget the gags about 
the ''blind date bureau" in your lobby or the 
park bench in front of the theatre with a 
large sign reading: "Sweethearts May Meet 
Here to See ‘Brother Rat and A Baby.’ " 


‘Brother Rat’ Dolls Return 
In Nationwide Promotion 


gets ’em all! Have your lo- 
cal barber shop start the 
“Brother Rat and A Baby” 
Haircut. Feature it in your 
ads, programs and_ barber 
shop window displays. 





Tie-Up Stills From Picture 


18 scene stills from “Brother Rat and A Baby,” all adaptable 
for local dealer tie-ups, to sell your showing from windows and 
counters all over town. Order complete set of “BB Tie-up Stills” 
from the Warner Bros. Campaign Plan Editor, 321 West 44th 


Street, New York City — $1.50, 10c individually. 


DT AWane Ae oe cee ee Perfume 

Violin 

Luggage 

Evening gowns Lady’s sweater set 
Radio Pipe 

Men’s and lady’s wristwatches 
Taxicab company 

Express company 


Knitting 
Model ship 


Needlepoint 





“Brother Rat” dolls which made 
such a big hit are featured again 
in Richard G. Kreuger Co. na- 
tionwide promotion. Tie-up calls 
for attractive window displays 
and advertising for local dealers. 
The dolls—18” tall with wash- 
able, hand-painted faces, in 
bright colors and cadet uniforms 
— are available to theatre in 
three’ styles: one containing 
spring music box which plays 
cadet melody and sells retail at 
$6.00 each; doll without music 
box at $4.00; and one to sell 
for $2.00. 


Start these promotions going: 
send dolls to local movie critics 
and prominent localites that 
will get you newspaper and 
word - of - mouth mention; use 
them as prizes in any contest 
you conduct; and spot them in 
your lobby displays. 





Priscilla Lane, star of ““Brother Rat 
and A Baby,” shown above holding 
a “Brother Rat’’ doll. 


For names of local dealers and special quantity prices, write 


Richard G. Kreuger Co., 1359 Broadway, New York City. 





FLASH 








THIS HERALD 


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litho herald (i 

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PER M 


For lots of 
5M and over 


Printing on one si 
, : e side, flat: enti 
imprint. Available a iad debe bent 
: ‘ e or co e —_——_ 
all Vitagraph exchanges. Order in cya $3.00 per M 
ies 
: less than 5M 


[16] 


in their fast 
Well, just wa 
jam 


mber the wacky prank 
and furious "!™ 
ie you § th 


Reme 
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they're in now! it 
ahead of anything 


ever done before: 





RENTAL DISPLAYS FOR YOUR LOBBY 


HII I IIIA IAI AIA IAAI AAAD AIA AAD AAA AAA AAA A AAAS ASA AAA SDA SAAD AA AAA AAD AIA AA IAA AIA AAA AAA ASDA SAA AAA A A AAAS A AAA AAA AAA ASIA AAAS A AAAS ASAASD AA AIK 


ACTION DISPLAY 22x 28's and INSERT 





COLORED 
22 x 28’s 
Rental: 20e each 









= encmemareercrensnemamnctenannan nt mc 
40 x 60 Full Color INSERT 
PHOTO GELATIN CARD 


Rental: 75c Each Rental: [2e each 





Full Set of Colored 11 x 14's to Tell 
the Story in Your Lobby 











40 x 54 Satin 
BANNERETTE 


COLORED 
Ii x 14’s 
Set of 8 
Rental: 


Price: $1.75 or Rental: $1.00 


C17] 


TWO WINDOW CARDS = STAR FOTOS 


PI IAI AAI IA IAAI AA AAA AA AAA AAAI AIA ASA SAA SAS SSSA S SAS ASS ACS SASASCSAISISA SSSA SAISACS SSIS SAS ACS SASS ASS SIS SAS SSS SASS S SS SSS SDS SASS SS SSS SS SASS SIS SASS SSC SASCSACSCOC CN 


REGULAR 
WINDOW CARD 


1 to 49..............¢e each 
50 to 99..............6e eaeh 
100 and over....d'2e each 








cae 
MIDGET CARD 


4e each 


PETER BG 
gastro WARNER BROS. 


pores en tenet oats 





PII IAA IA IIA IAA IAA AIA AAAS AAAS AA AAA SASS ASSIA S SA SASS SAS SASS SCS SSSA SI AAA IASI AAA IAA AAS AI ASA SAS AIA ASI ASA SAAS SSSA SSS SSS SASS SSD SAS SSS SSS SAS SAS SAS SC 


11x14 COLOR GLOS STAR PORTRAITS | 8 x 10 AUTOGRAPHED FAN FOTOS 








Ask your Vitagraph ad sales- 
man for speeial quantity 





Ge BD eeii ie ccdecccies ce 35e each 
DOGO 2A ii cisccsscccce 30e each 
DE & WOR icisoiesias 20¢ each Scie 


(Also available in 8” x 10” size 
at 15e each) 


HII IIIA IIIIK III IAAI IIA AI ISA ISIS ASSIS SASS ASSIS SSSCSISI SIS SIS SSISISS SISA SI SIS SISSICSSSISISISCSISISISSSISISSSCSCSICSSCSCSICSICSCSCSICSCSSCS SSIS S SSIS SCS SCSCSICS SSIS SSSI SISA 


SPECIAL 
LOBBY 
DISPLAYS 


DESIGNED SLIDE 
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each 


New York, N. Y. 





40” x 60” 
Hollywood Special 





[18] 


$ LOOK AT THIS PAPER . 
. THEN JACK UP 
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Preannted by 


WARNER BROS. 


Bi PORE ER, BROS. NE: PIASE SANT, si iater 


24-SHEET 


Get a big showing around town 
with this gay 24-sheet attention- 
getter. All posters are bril- 
liantly lithographed in full 
color. Buy them in quantities at 
the special prices listed below. 


a 


SIX-SHEET 


Rental: 48c each 


SPECIAL QUANTITY PRICES 


24-SHEETS 
Wo FG cip..cs crac eterna $2.40 each 
Fa iy Seen eres pam eee. $2.25 each 
LUNE = Bla a. 5 Sac a hn, eee $2.00 each 


DD OVER eile cic. s Hee ae $1.75 each 


PATE CN: bo Sere Wine: Tani Rhett lon 80c each 
BOG 99 oe ec. Cees st 70c each 
100 °& oversews cs. ees 60c each 


BOSTO. 99m ne Ce vas eden ok 32c each 
100) & Over cccstwesn soe 28c each 


LU TEN 1 ith’ fy Jeera a: enimarter tae iid Se 7k lle each 
ROO: Be OVO aici cutee eiarcatants 9c each 





- 8c each THREE-SHEET_p._, 
al: 246 deh 





















“The Major 
graduated 
from firing 
pins to firing 


safety pins — 
| fixed that!”’ 


OUST w, 
Ore? 


Y, SB» 


Scanned from the United Artists collection at the 
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, 
with support from Richard Koszarski. 





WISCONSIN CENTER 


FOR FILM & THEATER RESEARCH 


http://wcftr.commarts.wisc.edu 


MEDIA 
HISTORY 


DIGITAL LIBRARY 





www.mediahistoryproject.org